Pregnancy and Pediatric Chiropractor Blog


Expansions Coming to Mama’s Chiropractic Clinic

Posted by on 3:42 pm in Uncategorized | 0 comments

Here at Mama’s Chiropractic, we all feel like we have the best jobs in the world, and that comes down to our patients.  Doc likes to joke that holding babies is one of the benefits he provides for his employees, but the reality is, we all have huge hearts for pregnancy, birth, babies and families.  Every patient who walks in our door is an opportunity to build a relationship and offer the support that we know parents and children need—and it is our pleasure to do so.  Our practice would not be what it is today without our amazing patients, both past and present, and for that we thank each and every one of you who has come in, referred a friend or family member, or joined our community of conscious parents. Our office is different from many other chiropractors’ offices our patients may have been to.  Sure, we are correcting subluxations and are clearing the pathways for optimal brain and body communication.  However, our practice focuses on wellness for the whole family.  One of the ways we accommodate that principle is by operating as a membership-based service.  Our membership plans are simple: we looked at the average number of visits for a patient in their first year of care and the average number of visits for subsequent years of care were, and put together 2 types of visit frequency packages for both individuals and families.  Many of you reading this have participated in our membership plans and have seen lower costs associated with your visits than what you would pay under your insurance plan.  Most of you can get the care that supports you and your family without the visit limits that have held you back from this kind of wellness care in the past. The need for the specialized care we offer in our sunny Southwest Florida home is great and in order to expand our services to the areas we need to, the change is necessary. In the vein of respect, fairness and aligning with the goals we have for our patients, we wanted to announce in advance that the fees for our individual plans and pay-per-visit appointments will be increased starting September 15, 2020.  This fee increase will not impact existing individual plans on a monthly payment plan, only on individual plans and pay-per-visit appointments purchased on or after September 15, 2020.  If you were on the fence about initiating care, the time to call to make that appointment is now! You might be asking yourself, why now?  The need for the specialized care we offer in our sunny Southwest Florida home is great and in order to expand our services to the areas we need to, the change is necessary.  We are looking forward to opening a new location in Fort Myers to better serve our patients in Lee County.  We have also hired 2 new Webster certified chiropractors.  Dr. Ashley Figueroa-Melendez will be in our North Port office and Dr. Danielle Dietrich will be in our Cape Coral office for now but will be part of our Lee County expansion to serve both Cape Coral and Fort Myers. We look forward to expanding and growing with and for our wonderful patients.  If you have any concerns, as always please feel free to reach...

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Can Chiropractic Care Lessen Your Chance of Postpartum Depression?

Posted by on 5:30 pm in Breastfeeding, Child Development, Lifestyle, Newborn, Pregnancy, Proactive Wellness | 0 comments

What Does Chiropractic Care Have to Do With Postpartum Depression? We conducted an informal poll on our Facebook and Instagram social media pages asking veteran mamas what their advice for new breastfeeding mamas would be. A lot of the theme that was weaved throughout the conversation had to do with the mental health of the mom. As new moms we are bombarded with images of peaceful parenting, easy breezy breastfeeding, and instagram-perfectly-put-together moms and their super trendy babies and toddlers. So much of actual motherhood is a far cry from that. It’s tears, frustration, cheerios smashed into the carpet. It’s yoga pants for the second day in a row and choosing sleep over working out (or working out over sleep). Its slobbery kisses, six am wake ups on the weekend, and coffee that’s been reheated for the 3rd time before 11 am.   We are told that breast is best. But then see images that portray that moms are supposed to get up and get on with their lives. Go back to work full time, maintain the house, make sure the other kids are happy, fully entertained but also well adjusted and mindful. Mounting pressure to do it all. Well-meaning providers, parents and grandparents provide well-meaning advice of “happy, healthy baby is all that matters”. But we have to ask, what about a happy, healthy mama? Because let’s face it, mamas are the backbone, they are the ship that keeps the whole show afloat. If mama is struggling, so is everyone else. Well-meaning providers, parents and grandparents provide well-meaning advice of “happy, healthy baby is all that matters”. But we have to ask, what about a happy, healthy mama? Since 2015, we have collected the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale, a screening tool we use to indicate perinatal mood disorders or postpartum depression and/or anxiety, on every one of our late third trimester and postpartum patients through 12 months postpartum. We do this because we see our pregnant and postpartum mamas more than any other provider. Often times, toward the end of their pregnancies we are seeing mamas 2-3 times a week, which continues into their postpartum period. Far more frequently than any obstetrician or midwife during the perinatal period. If we have the opportunity to follow these mamas throughout their pregnancies and postpartum, then we also have the opportunity to refer them to the appropriate services and provide support along the way. We decided to take a look at the data we have collected since 2015. We found several patients who have been under care who have filled out the survey during their late third trimester, at their first visit postpartum, at their 90 day re-exam, and then 9 months postpartum. What we found: Baseline scores taken in the late third trimester were higher than the postpartum comparison Towards the end of the “4th trimester” or around 3 months postpartum, indicators for postpartum mood disorders were slightly higher than they were in the initial postpartum time Good news, upon retesting at the 9 month postpartum mark, patients scores decreased, on average, to closely resemble baseline scores collected in the late 3rd trimester 5% of patients initially postpartum had results that indicated that mamas was struggling with postpartum depression/anxiety. That number dropped to 3% at their 90-day re-exam Of the...

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Three Things You Should Know About Detoxing If You’re Pregnant or Nursing

Posted by on 3:53 pm in Uncategorized | 0 comments

Many people recommend doing some form of cleanse every change in season. What if you’re pregnant or nursing, though? If that’s the case, chat with your provider then modify how you do it. The TL;DW version of #OneBellyWednesday: Just for the Pregnant Mamas & BF’ers. In this week’s #OneBellyWednesday I discuss my journey through detoxes. I’ve done everything from The Master Cleanse to Juice Fasts to a Gallbladder flush. I don’t think there’s many I haven’t tried. My favorite organ to start with is the large intestine. It’s the organ that holds our toxins; that’s the definition of it’s job. The regal colon takes water from our waste, then holds the waste for elimination. The mucosa of the organ traps stuff that really shouldn’t be there, and housecleaning is a really good idea. Click here to learn 5 signs your body needs detoxing right now. Two Ways to Do It I usually drink Traditional Medicinal’s Organic Smooth Move (I like peppermint, but they make a chocolate). It contains senna, an herb that makes the bowels move and the mucosa release. This is not recommended for pregnant or nursing mothers. I give the directions for how I use it in the full video below. The full version, including tips for non-pregnant or nursing people and detoxing What I recommend for pregnant or nursing moms is called bentonite clay. Check out the video for the directions, including the thing you have to know about clay detoxes. The basic directions: 1/4 tsp of clay1 pint of waterStir and sit overnight Do NOT Do These Things!  Don’t Eat or Take Supplements for 30 minutes after drinking the clay.  This stuff is designed to absorb, so instead of your body absorbing your nutrients, they’ll leave as really expensive poo.  Do take a good quality probiotic while you’re detoxing.  You’ll be kicking out the baddies, so it’s critical you replace them with the good.  We use Klaire Labs probiotics in our office. Finally, the absolute rule:  Don’t trust a fart on a detox!  You will be gassy, you might think you can sneak one by, but you only have to screw this up once to never forget. ...

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How to make the Big Parenting Decisions when the Pressure is On

Posted by on 6:30 pm in Uncategorized | 0 comments

How to make the Big Parenting Decisions when the Pressure is On

Preparing for Parenting If you are like most new parents you pour your energy into the pregnancy. You write a birth plan. You have assembled a team of wonderful providers. The baby comes, and now… what? Does that sound familiar? Worse yet, doctors come at you in the first hours after baby is born with a list of things they want you to do. They position it in dramatic terms, and you don’t feel qualified to say “No.” So what do you do? Sometimes you have to breathe and say to yourself “Don’t Leash the Puppy.” The first step is to stay out of that defensive position. Be proactive. My intake form asks the same questions to every pregnant patient in my office. I want them to think about the big picture items, so I find out if any of their birth providers have talked with them about: BreastfeedingCircumcisionVaccinationCo-SleepingBaby wearingCar Seat Installation I like to open conversation doors. As a physician I don’t dictate what someone should or shouldn’t do. I ask my patients to make decisions based on their values, and share with them the places that have informed my reference points. Below are a few of them. Let Nature be your GuideValue Autonomy, even your child’sThe Innate Intelligence in your baby put all those cells together, it must know what it’s doing.Don’t Leash the Puppy Resources Check out this podcast, Happy Births, Happy Babies: Hosted by Dr. Jay Warren Ina May Gaskin Quotes One Conscious Path In Parenting Dr. Jeanne Ohm Full Issue of this Pathways Magazine: https://issuu.com/pathways/docs/pw39_fall2013_ma8h The Circumcision Decision– the article that shifted my mind on the...

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COVID-19 Pregnancy Study Reveals Incidence Rate

Posted by on 2:11 pm in Current Events, News, Pregnancy | 0 comments

COVID-19 Pregnancy Study Reveals Incidence Rate

A funny thing happens when you use actual numbers. https://youtu.be/UQ5IL-d1y5o NYU doctors recently submitted a survey of 215 pregnancies reporting for birth to their hospital. Their take: “High” levels of asymptomatic pregnant people are ticking time bombs. But let’s define “High,” shall we? Google search results for the study show what bloggers and media are focused on. Four pregnant women who tested positive for COVID-19 had fevers out of 215 screened. Three asymptomatic patients tested positive for COVID-19 but ended up with fevers before discharge. Two of those women were treated for a suspected uterus infection. This infection type impacts at the minimum 7% of all pregnancies, but up to 71% of c-sections. The authors write: Two of these patients received antibiotics for presumed endomyometritis (although 1 patient did not have localizing symptoms), and 1 patient was presumed to be febrile due to Covid-19 and received supportive care.(emphasis added) Maybe I’m old-school, but this bothers me. Of the 3 asymptomatic patients who tested positive, all 3 could have had a variety of other things going on but were still labeled COVID-related. One Way to Read These Numbers If we look at the raw numbers then, I’d give weight to the symptomatic pregnant patients who were COVID-19 positive and didn’t have a confirmed (or suspected) underlying issue. That means 4 of 215, or 1.8%, of cases were symptomatic and positive. Not dead, mind you. They just had a fever. 29 other women (remember, within 3 days you’re going to have 3 of these women get suspected into COVID-19-related illness) could carry the virus in their nose without batting an eye. That means they have healthy immune systems and are preparing their bodies with antibodies to protect their babies. But that’s not what’s reported, is it? However the authors highlight a different conclusion. …more than one of eight asymptomatic patients who were admitted to the labor and delivery unit were positive for SARS-CoV-2. … (This) underscores the risk of Covid-19 among asymptomatic obstetrical patients. Moreover, the true prevalence of infection may be underreported because of false negative results of tests to detect SARS-CoV-2. This is how well meaning, educated people can come to different conclusions given the same set of data. From the screencap above, you can see how the study morphed into clickbait. Where I see hope for strong systems, they see boogeymen pushing baby buggies. The authors admit to geographical limitations of their data, but I’d like to also offer small sample size as a bias. Why? Because my favorite little public health experiment has reached it’s conclusion. Florida’s likely incidence: 1% I’ve reported on the UF Public Health study in The Villages multiple times (at 600, at 1400, and again last week). Among a high-risk population (median age 70) in Florida, the researchers found a very different level of COVID-19 infection. Now at 3680 tests, overall just 1% (45 patients) tested positive for coronavirus. 42 of the 1580 symptomatic people tested positive. That means over 97% of the people who were coughing, sneezing, had fevers, or traveled to New York had some other reason for it than COVID-19. Of the remaining 2100 people who had no symptoms, 2 who had forgotten they’d traveled and 1 who was negative but became symptomatic and positive later, were in the boogeyman...

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Prepping for VBAC

Posted by on 12:54 pm in Pregnancy, Proactive Wellness, Uncategorized | 0 comments

This #OneBellyWednesday discusses two successful VBAC cases Not all VBACs present with the same issues. Here’s two successful cases from the office. April has been a baby bonanza in our office: Six births, four at home, with two VBACs and a couple still on the clock. The VBAC births (Vaginal Birth After Cesarean) or TOLAC (Trial of Labor After Cesarean) are always special to me. I love the opportunity to address the reason for the first surgical birth! Most times I’m doing a lot of reassuring in the 3rd trimester. I find myself saying several things: “Your body is different this time around.” “You are communicating in a new way.” “There is so much more balance in your body now.” These two were a little different, though. In both cases the mothers had some level of chiropractic care during the first pregnancy. In one case I worked furiously in the last portion of the third trimester to get baby room to go from breech to head down, but she was too long to make the rotation. The other mother was under care with a dear friend of mine. But as a pregnancy specialist, there were some things about her pelvis I was able to pick up. Those subtle findings changed the dynamics the second go-around. Their management represented opposite ends of the VBAC spectrum. The first had a strong core and lot of fascia to release for baby to engage. The second had a really strong pelvic floor but hypermobile joints. Here’s how we gave both the births they were looking for. Find a Perinatal Chiropractor Near You!...

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Spring solved Covid-19

Posted by on 4:13 pm in Current Events, Healthy Living, Medicine, News, Uncategorized | 0 comments

Spring solved Covid-19

So long to Covid-19 treatment blogs: Synergy and the zinc theory I spent a few weeks tracking down the information on COVID-19, hydroxychloroquine / chloroquine, zinc, and azithromycin. In that process I found some bloggers who are doing a much, much better job at exploring the research than I am (shout outs to ASBMB, NephJC again, and “Hello!” Derek Lowe. Never did I think I’d find myself high-fiving a pharmacologist, but here I am). They’ve pointed me in some interesting directions, including back to focusing on my patient base. Unless there’s a compelling reason that relates specifically to pregnancy or pediatrics, I think I’ll let them do the commentary from now on. Preview: There is, and I’m going to write about it next! Before I totally give up on life, let me help connect a few dots. First, chloroquine studies back the zinc + hydroxychloroquine combination. The two drugs aren’t identical, let’s say that first. But ultimately chloroquine increases the permeability of cell membranes to zinc, and zinc does all kinds of lovely anti-microbial things inside a cell. This includes red blood cells– chloroquine can cross those membranes, which is likely the reason it’s so good against the organism associated with malaria. There are also studies that point to zinc deficiency being related to anemia. Guess who also tends to get anemia? People with respiratory infections. Computers aren’t clinical research Speaking of blood, a few friends forwarded me a blog based on a publication that claimed to crack the code on COVID-19. I have seen the research on the S spike protein and ACE-2 in the cell membrane all over the place, but this suggested the virus attacked hemoglobin, knocked an iron off the cell, then induced all kinds of free radical damage. This was a competing theory I spent days tracking down. The blogger has a unique insight. He strings together some interesting clinical science, but I don’t know that the paper confirms what he’s saying it does. Ultimately it lead me to a few things. This paper is based on a computer model. The computer program was instructed to make best case scenarios for the interaction between the virus and hemoglobin. Other models of COVID-19 are more compelling. Derek Lowe points to an x-ray crystallography study showing the interaction between the ACE-2 and spikes, and another suggesting that the affinity for ACE-2 isn’t as strong for Covid-19 as it is for SARS. The x-ray crystallography study, which is super-geeky and well done, pointed out that in their real-life models of interaction the COVID-19 and ACE-2 would only bind in a rather finicky way. Therefore, we can’t really apply the favorable manipulation to the real world. It doesn’t seem to happen that way. This isn’t to say the whole theory is wrong; but so far it isn’t backed up by the individual paper. Which brings us to Z-paks I’ve been right there with most of you- why are they recommending a very effective anti-biotic for a virus? Well, why are they recommending a very effective anti-malarial (parasitic) for a virus? Because it’s not the first time, there’s a little evidence, and when people are desperate they try things off-label. I will again re-iterate what I said before, and I’m now seeing echoed by people far smarter than me...

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Birthing In Covidia

Posted by on 10:21 pm in Pregnancy | 0 comments

Birthing In Covidia

This week’s #OneBellyWednesday discusses a homebirth headed for the hospital, and what some expertise in the situation can do to get a birth back on track. If you are 36 weeks pregnant or later, I’m sure you’re asking some different questions about your birth experience.  This week we had 3 babies from our office born at home, and I attended one of them.  There are techniques that body and birthworkers can apply during labor to help. Resources Spinning Babies®– A series of activites designed to balance the pelvis to get mom and baby ready for birth. Dynamic Body Balancing– Developed by the woman I refer to as the Godmother of Perinatal Chiropractic, Dr. Carol Phillips.  These techniques were the foundation for Spinning Babies® and involve cranial sacral techniques that were developed through Dr. Phillips’ 30+ years of attending births.  Here are a few directories to find providers near you: ICPA-trained Perinatal Chiropractors: www.discoverkidshealth.com Spinning Babies® Aware Practitioners More examples of the Forward Leaning Inversion. We’d prefer to have our patients more inverted, and have patients settle down on her heels at the end. The duration is going to depend on the situation- during the labor I describe, we did these for several contractions in a row with some breaks in...

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KISS Syndrome: Inconsolable Baby

Posted by on 7:37 pm in Breastfeeding, Colicky Babies, Newborn, Subluxation | 0 comments

KISS Syndrome: Inconsolable Baby

3 week old who won’t settle or stop crying A 3 week old who is inconsolable after a rough birth gets comfortable with chiropractic. This week’s One Belly, Two Brains story is about a brand new patient to the office. He’s 3 weeks old and experienced a difficult birth. The mother told us he has a difficult time being set down, sleeping on his own, and constantly cries a “pain cry.” When he sleeps he holds his arms up tightly. His latch is instantly painful every time they nurse despite looking decent from a latching on perspective. Findings Kinematic Imbalance due to Suboccital Strain, or K.I.S.S. is an acronym used by pediatric chiropractors to describe these babies. Their heads tilt back. Their backs arch. In fact, most of these babies are uncomfortable in any position. What we find clinically is the back of the skull where the brainstem comes out is being squished by the back edge of the hole (the foramen magnum). K.I.S.S. presentation is often associated with traumatic births, which matches this boy’s story. The large hole in the skull where the brainstem exits is the foramen magnum. Can Chiropractic Help? K.I.S.S. is effectively another name for a chiropractic subluxation of the occiput. I don’t see these a lot; usually the skull goes the opposite way, but if the surgeon has to use the head for a lever to pull the baby out, it can certainly happen. This little boy is the first vacuum-assisted surgical birth I can recall seeing. He showed mild signs of both cortical and brain stem trauma. We saw big changes in the first two adjustment visits. He slept in 2 blocks for 2 hours longer than his normal after the first visit. During the second this “constant crier” fell asleep, arms relaxed, in my hands while I adjusted him. References Biedermann, Heiner. “Manual Therapy in Children: Proposals for an Etiologic Model.” Journal of Manipulative & Physiological Therapeutics, Volume 28, Issue 3, e1 – e15 doi: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jmpt.2005.02.011 Rooks et al. “Prevalence and Evolution of Intracranial Hemorrhage in Asymptomatic Term Infants.” American Journal of Neuroradiology Jun 2008, 29 (6) 1082-1089; DOI:...

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Wear a mask or go outside? A theory for a divided nation

Posted by on 9:41 pm in Current Events, Healthy Living | 0 comments

Wear a mask or go outside?  A theory for a divided nation

Why Numbers for a Nation Could be Wrong TL;DR Version Making sense of conflicting study recommendations: If you live in the northern 2/3 of the USA, are over 65, have high blood pressure, or are Vitamin D deficient because you work indoors or at night, it’s likely that you should listen to the shelter in home/wear a mask suggestions. If you live in the southern 1/3 rather than focusing on those recommendations, it may be more beneficial to spend more time outdoors. The highlights version: If you live above this line, your recommendations for Covid-19 protection could be different than if you live in the sunbelt. The Uncut Video The full version discusses research and potential areas for improving our reactions to the pandemic. Check it out! A part of me feels badly for those in charge of Public Health Policy for the United States.  Their job is to protect everyone, and yet we are facing a Covid-19 challenge that does not impact everyone equally.  The science is clear that those over 65 with blood pressure issues, those with low estrogen, and those who are Vitamin D deficient (which may come with the companions of sleep-poor but stress-rich) are likely the preferred targets of Covid-19.  An ongoing study by the University of Florida has expanded on earlier findings and now reports among 1400 volunteers in an over-60 community,  zero tested positive for Covid-19.  Well, two did, but on follow-up both had either traveled and/or had symptoms when they registered for the test. The doctors tested nearly 900 symptomatic people (2280 total).  There were a total of 23 positives among 2280 tests, with 900 of those people having coughs, fevers, traveled, sneezes (I know, not a symptom, but it’s listed on the form), etc. That’s around 1% infection in the sample among high risk individuals, symptoms and not. Still zero asymptomatic carriers. The question is Why.  Reports of 25% (CDC) to 50% (Iceland genomics company) of asymptomatic people could be carriers directly conflict with these findings.  My statements on this: First the Iceland story is bad reporting of the analysis.  In 9,000 DNA tests, 1% came back Covid-19 positive.  Half of those people didnt’ have symptoms.   That’s not the same as 50% of asymptomatic people carry Covid. The correct answer would be .5%.  Second, the early reports on pre-symptomatic transimisson suggest a 3 day interval between contact with a case and the onset of symptoms.  This is why there are questions on screening forms about being in contact with travelers who have developed symptoms.  So now we have a new term: Pre-Symptomatic.  This is the bridge between those who have no symptoms and do, and only they know if they’ve been to an area with Covid-19 or in contact with people who are positive.   The Grocery Store Boogeyman This is where the fear kicks in. People are afraid that they’re going to get coughed on at Publix by an elderly Asian man and have to burn their clothes. I want to re-iterate something. In the UF The Villages sample, nearly 883 people looked like they were getting sick or had traveled. Only 23 had Covid-19. It’s up to you how you feel when someone in the grocery store coughs. But do understand that 97% of the time it is...

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